How To Train A Dog To Stop Pulling On A Leash

Pulling on a leash can be an unwanted habit acquired by many dogs. However, often well-meaning owners encourage this particular behaviour.

Unknowingly, owners prompt this unwanted behavior by playing games such as leash war tug, or even just using a rope (a rope can resemble a puppy’s leash).

Pulling on a leash can be an unwanted habit acquired by many dogs!.

How To Train A Dog To Stop Pulling On A Leash

  • When teaching a puppy not to pull, or perhaps retraining a dog that has developed the bad habit of pulling the leash, the use of a quality harness could be a huge help. Try to train a dog to accept the dog harness the same way your dog accepts the regular dog collar clasp.
  • Try using a lure or toy to keep your dog at your side whenever you walk the dog. A properly applied dog training collar can be an effective way to train a problem dog. Make sure you choose a properly fitting training collar or choke chain.
  • You must always make sure the leash is loose while taking your dog for a walk. In case the dog begins to pull in front, the dog owner should change directions instantly so that the puppy quickly finds himself falling behind. Changing directions is important before the puppy reaches the end of its leash. Apart from the split second it takes the handler to change course, the leash should remain loose. A short tug, accompanied by a quick slackening of the lead, should be used.
  • You should never let the puppy drag you around whenever you train a puppy. It is absolutely essential to teach a dog to walk properly while they are still small enough to manage, especially when handling a massive breed of dogs. If your Great Dane of 150 pounds hasn’t learned how to walk properly while he or she is a puppy of 20 lbs, it’s probably never going to.
  • Never yank or tug the puppy’s neck when it comes to correcting it is crucial. A light, continuous pressure works much better than a hard yank. The ideal strategy is to use minimal pressure to achieve the desired result.

Revealed at last by one of America’s top professional dog trainers, a simple training strategy that…

… Develops your Dog’s “Hidden Intelligence”To eliminate bad behavior and Create the obedient, well-behaved pet of your dreams… (click here)

How To Train Your German Shepherd To Be Obedient

If you don’t know it yet, the ferocious-looking massive dogs you see with police officers or bomb squads makes for an excellent family pet. You might find that quite hard to believe but this large breed is strong, athletic and fiercely loyal – just the characteristics you’d want in a guard dog. Having said that, before you actually go and get your little German Shepherd puppy, here are a few basic things you need to keep in mind:

1. Do your research. German Shepherds are unlike other dog breeds. Because of their massive size and energy, they can be potentially dangerous and destructive. It pays to read up on this particular breed to get to know them before you even bring one home. Knowing what to expect and what to do in certain situations can save you from a ton or worry and money.

2. Be sure you’re ready. German Shepherds take a while to mature. Some experts would say these dogs don’t mature until about three years. Before bringing home a young pup, be very sure you are ready for the long haul. Domesticating these dogs that grow into massive, intelligent working dogs takes a lot of patience, commitment and energy.

Training a German Shepherd

Although individual dog owners may successfully train a German Shepherd, bringing your pup into a dog-training class may prove to be a great way to train your dog. Especially if you have never owned nor trained a German Shepherd before. Besides being trained by professionals, your dog learns from these classes what behavior is socially acceptable. Socialization is an important part of a German Shepherds training to curb their instinct for dominance.

If you choose to train your dog yourself, here are some helpful insights into German Shepherd training:

1. Start early. As soon as you bring home your new dog, begin training straight away, with emphasis on socialization. German Shepherd dogs easily develop aggressive tendencies toward other dogs and strangers as they begin to recognize and develop fierce loyalty and protectiveness toward their owners and their properties.

2. Exercise them well. A regular, rigorous exercise should be part of the dog’s training routine. The German Shepherd is a powerful dog bursting with energy. They need enough time for exercise and play. Otherwise, they’d get bored and restless. A bored German Shepherd can be very destructive.

3. Ensure consistency. Even before you introduce the dog to the family, make sure everyone knows and understands your ground rules for the new dog and enforces them. It will be more difficult to train the dog if anyone in the house lets them get away with misbehavior, more so as the dog grows older.

4. Establish yourself as the leader of the pack. German Shepherds are great working dogs because they respect leadership. This insight into these dogs’ mentality should be an advantage. Make this your primary goal. If you establish this master-dog authority relationship from the beginning, you’ll be in a better position to control, manage and train your dog further.

You can find out more on German Shepherd Training here

For more information on dog training and for solutions to a variety of dog problems please visit germanshepherdhandbook

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How To Train Your Dog To Come When Called Every Time

How To Train Your Dog To Come When Called Every Time

Training your dog to ‘come’ when you ask is not simply an issue of obedience. It can also be a matter of safety and certainly it is a big part of good manners in a variety of circumstances.

Certainly if you and your dog frequent off-leash dog parks, walk on off-leash trails or in the woods, you will want her tot come when you call either to go home or just to check that she’s okay and still within earshot.

In the chaos of saying goodbye to visitors, your dog goes through the door with them and is headed for the street. Don’t you want to feel confident that when you say, “Puppy, come”, your dog will turn away from danger?

It’s likely that not all your visitors will appreciate being jumped on when they arrive. Your ability to have your dog ‘come’ to you will mean a calmer entrance and a more pleasant greeting fro everyone.

First, though, let’s talk a little bit about how to teach your puppy NOT to come.

Scenario: Your puppy is playing with other dogs in the dog park or in a friend’s fenced yard, wherever… you call puppy to ‘come’. She comes. You snap on her leash and leave. It won’t take many repetitions of this before she no longer comes. What you have taught her is that coming to you means the end of fun. NOW, there’s problem. Your puppy no longer comes reliablywhen you call. That’s not going to work!

Training your puppy to ‘come’ when you ask is not simply an issue of obedience. It can also be a matter of safety and certainly it is a big part of good manners in a variety of circumstances.

Certainly if you and your dog frequent off-leash dog parks, walk on off-leash trails or in the woods, you will want her tot come when you call either to go home or just to check that she’s okay and still within earshot.

In the chaos of saying goodbye to visitors, your dog goes through the door with them and is headed for the street. Don’t you want to feel confident that when you say, “Puppy, come”, your dog will turn away from danger?

It’s likely that not all your visitors will appreciate being jumped on when they arrive. Your ability to have your dog ‘come’ to you will mean a calmer entrance and a more pleasant greeting fro everyone.

First, though, let’s talk a little bit about how to teach your puppy NOT to come.

Scenario: Your puppy is playing with other dogs in the dog park or in a friend’s fenced yard, wherever… you call puppy to ‘come’. She comes. You snap on her leash and leave. It won’t take many repetitions of this before she no longer comes. What you have taught her is that coming to you means the end of fun. NOW, there’s problem. Your puppy no longer comes reliablywhen you call. That’s not going to work!

If you catch this early on, it’s easy enough to fix. Really, it’s what you ought to have done in the first place.

Quite simply, when your puppy is playing with others in an off-leash area, call her to you every minute or so, grab her collar, give her a treat and say, “Go play.” Do that several times. The next time you call and she comes, grab her collar, praise her and say, “Go play.” No treat. If she shows any reluctance to come, go back to the treat for a couple more repetitions. Then just praise her when she comes and release her with the “go play”. The play becomes the reward.

Choose carefully your times to call her. If she’s completely absorbed in rough and tumble play, chances of her coming are greatly reduced. Watch the action. Wait for a moment’s pause, then call. The minute she turns towards you, begin a stream of “good dog”, “what a good dog”, ” what a clever girl”. I.e. talk her to you.

Depending on how reliably she usually comes, you may have to move a little closer the first few times. Do NOT go right to her. Wait for the pause in play. You may only be 2 feet away from her at this point.. Call her name. Pause. “Come”. When she comes, grab her collar, praise her, give her a treat and release her with “go play”.

Above all, do not stand 20 or 30 feet away calling, “Puppy, come” in an increasingly louder and more irritated tone. You do want her to come, don’t you?

Now, let’s go back to the early days of having your puppy…

You bring her home when she’s somewhere around 8 weeks of age.

First: Use her name to get her attention. Reward her when she turns towards you. Practise now using the release word you have chosen – OK, All done, Free.

I found it difficult to remember to release my dog when I trained my own puppy many years ago, so I suggest you start training yourself early and often. It’s important to let puppy know that she’s now free to resume whatever else she may have been doing.

When you say, “Puppy” and she turns toward the sound of your voice, add “come”.

It looks like this: stand very still in front of and about 1 foot away from your puppy. Say, “Puppy, come”. As she begins to move (even a tiny motion) in your direction, begin to praise her (an excited high-pitched tone works best) and take a few short rapid steps backwards, encouraging your puppy as she moves. Don’t move more than 2 feet. When she reaches you, grab her collar, give her a treat and lots of praise and release her.

When she has moved to a different location – could be a different area of the same room, a different room or even two feet away from where you just asked for a “come”, repeat. Repeat this 2 or 3 times. That’ll do for this session. You can move a little farther back if she’s coming to you willingly and quickly when you ask.

I think it’s important to simply incorporate training into daily activity. As you move around throughout the day, ask Puppy to “come”, “sit”. Then reward, praise and release her. By the end of day 1, the reward is the release and only very occasionally will there be a treat. That’s very important.

We’re talking about a very young puppy here so when I say move around, the puppy is only with you outside her confinement area when she’s empty.

When puppy is coming to you whenever you ask at a distance of, say, 4 feet, 8 times out of 10, it’s time to step it up.

Now, from a beginning distance of 2 feet, ask puppy to come and when she does, hold a treat at her nose, move it between her eyes back over her head. Her bum drops to the floor and you’ve now got a “sit”.

Do it again and as you put the treat to her nose, say, “Puppy, sit”. Treat moves back, bum goes to floor. Praise, treat and release.

Stay with your 4 foot distance for a few (3-5) repetitions as you now ask for a “come, sit’ before you reward, praise and release.

Try omitting the food reward after 3 or 4 repetitions. The sound of your happy voice and the release are the best rewards for your puppy.

Continue to give a treat from time to time for an especially quick “come’ or a speedy, straight “sit’. That’s called random reinforcement and it prevents reliance on food rewards. You don’t really want to have a pocketful of treats for the rest of your dog’s life, do you?

In a few short steps, here’s how it works:

1. Reward and praise puppy for responding to her name.

2. Reward, praise and release puppy when you ask her to “come” and she does.

3. When she “comes” reliably, add “sit” before the reward. So – “Puppy, come, Puppy, sit”. Tell her she’s a good puppy and reward her with a treat or a toy, whichever she likes best.

4. As the reliability of “Puppy, come” increases i.e. she comes 8 times out of 10 requests, increase first the distance between you and then add distractions.

Get a reliable “come” (recall) at a distance of 20 -30 feet in a safe area before asking for a “come” when your puppy is playing with a group of dogs (distraction).

As with all puppy training, once the request is taught, you must continue to ask for it frequently throughout her lifetime. Reward occasionally with a treat or a toy and always praise and release.

What a clever owner! What a good dog!

Visit: www.braintraining4dogs.com . By following her training suggestions, you’re sure to develop a great relationship with your dog!

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What Is Dog Separation Anxiety and How to Reduce It | Brain Training Dogs

This problem is seen quite often in shelter dogs. I am dealing with this issue as a dog that I just adopted from a shelter has separation anxiety. If the problem is not treated or worked on it can lead to more stressful problems. This problem is not seen in every dog.

The big question is:

“How to train my dog with separation anxiety?”

Some of the signs to look for are:

Some dogs has more extreme case of separation anxiety and be more destructive than others.

Destructive like chewing on shoes or furniture, scratching, digging or going to the bathroom on the floors.

Barking, whining, howling.

Depression, lack of appetite, trouble breathing.

Following you from room to room.

The dog starts running in circles as you are getting ready to leave.

Some dogs may attempt to escape from the house to look for you.

=>THIS IS THE BEST WAY TO REDUCE ANXIETY (WITH SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS)<=

How To Help A Puppy With Separation Anxiety? You will find solutions below!

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For a shelter dog that has been adopted is to have patience. The dog will learn new commands better to help combat the issue if he feels that the new home is safe, secure environment. Need to bond with your dog like playing and going on walks. This will help to use up his energy and be ready to relax alone. Create a quiet safe space for the dog only. Over time your dog will learn that he will be safe in that space while you are gone.

Next is to keep departure and arrival low key. This may be hard at first. For departing try not to pay attention to the dog for 10 to 15 minutes before leaving the house. After arriving home ignore the dog for a few minutes, than acknowledge him with some calming petting or hugs.

Offer some more comforting things for the dog by leaving a piece of clothing that will have your scent on it. This will help relax and some sense of familiarity because of your scent. Also don’t forget to leave his favorite toys and treats. Buy some treat games to him busy and the brain mentally stimulating while you are gone.

You could introduce a safety cue to be used such as “that you will be right back” for every time you leave the house. Start small by using the safety cue when you are going outside with the trash. Most of the time you are only gone a few minutes. Than keep building up the time you are away.

At first practice your departure routine by gathering your things that you take every day with you and sit down. Repeat this routine till your dog show no signs of distress. This way you are establishing a routine. Most dogs love having a daily routine with it master.

Don’t be cruel to your dog by yelling or ignoring him. This may cause the problem to get worse. Try to calm him down with relaxing petting and talking softy to him in a low tone.

The best piece of advice is to be patient, consistent and persisted in the technique you are using.

Separation anxiety is not a result of lack of training or disobedience but it’s a panic response.

Fawn Redman just adopted a dog that has separation anxiety issues. This is first dog that she had owned with this issue. Started a website selling many different kinds of dog products. Browse the selection now.

3 Essential Tips To Successfully House Train Older Dogs

3 Essential Tips To Successfully House Train Older Dogs
Field Dogs 300 x 600

House training older dogs is a more delicate process than with younger dogs. If you are looking to adopt an older dog that was not previously exposed to any house training at a young age, it is going to bring along its bad habits such as chewing, excessive barking, making holes in the yard or “marking” the territory. 

Besides, you will likewise encounter more challenges in house preparing more seasoned pooches as they will in general react and advancement much slower to most preparing strategies and directions than more youthful mutts.

Here are 3 useful tips that can help you in house training older dogs successfully.

  • To the exclusion of everything else, an absolute enrollment at the vet is critical to clear out any present therapeutic issues or challenges, for instance, urinary tract or bug defilements. Progressively settled mutts may in like manner experience some kind of free insides if there is a startling change from their past dietary inclinations. Make an effort not to rebuke him for these “mistakes”. Or maybe be tireless and license your dog seven days to conform to the movements well ordered. If conditions did not improve, counsel your vet.
  • Consistently develop a routine schedule for eating and drinking for your doggie. This urges you to easily screen your dog’s can inclinations and pick when to bring your pet out for a walk each time the individual finishes its meals. Most adult mutts will by and large take out 30 – 45 minutes resulting to eating or drinking. Get acquainted with the signs and watch out for snippets of data of spinning around and sniffing the floor.
  • Older dogs have shorter attention spans therefore more repetitions are needed during the house training process to reinforce the desired habits. Never use violence on them if they make a mess in the house. Scolding the dog is pointless unless you actually see it eliminating indoors. Use a firm voice command “No” and guide the dog to its designated spot. Praise or reward your dog when it relieves itself outdoors.

Therefore, house training an older dog successfully depend a lot on your consistency, discipline and perseverance. Treating the dog with patience and understanding, using the appropriate house training methods are the main ingredients to developing a well behaved adult dog with good toilet habits.

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11 Simple Tips For Dog Owners | Brain Training Dogs

Over the years I’ve learned quite a few tips & tricks that owning a dog a bit easier. Some of it waslearned by reading & research, but most of it was learned the old fashioned way through trial & error. Here’s 11 simple life tips for dog owners :

Simple Tips For Dog Owners: Housekeeping & Cleaning Tips

1.Use Covers to Keep Your Furniture Fur Free

Do you allow your pets on the furniture? If you do you’re well aware of how hard is to keep them clean. My favorite tip for keeping your furniture clean and fur free is to use a cover. You can use sheets, blankets or slip covers — and if you want something to match your decor you can get them custom made. When it’s cleaning time you just throw those covers in the wash & you’re good to go.

2.Dryer Sheets Pick up Dog Hair

Looking for a simple way to pick up some of that dog hair? Use dryer sheets. They pick up loose dog hair on fabric like magic. Just rub a dryer sheet over your couch or wherever else pet hair collects and watch as it clings right to it.

3.Use Rubber Gloves to Pick up Stray Dog Hair

Does your puppies hair get all over, or is it just me? My most loved technique for grabbing all that free hair is utilizing a couple of rubber gloves. You put them on and run you hands over your furnishings; it’s stunning how well pet hair sticks to elastic gloves.

 Use Rubber Gloves to Pick up Stray Dog Hair

4.Use Baking Soda to Clean up Pet Urine

If your dog pees on the carpet use baking soda to clean it up. Pour some baking soda over the spot, let it sit for 20 minutes and then vacuum it up.

5.Utilize a Window Squegee to Clean Up Fur From Carpet

Do you get a huge amount of puppy hair stopped profound into your floor covering? Utilize a window squegee to get hide in your floor covering and on your furnishings. Rub it along the floor covering and simply watch as that hair comes up.

6.Conceal Scratch Marks on Furniture with a Walnut

Do you have a couple of scratch blemishes on your wooden furnishings? You can cover them up by rubbing a walnut over them. The characteristic oils in walnuts saturate wood, making them a straightforward method to help conceal little scratches in your furnishings.

7.Utilize a Magic Eraser to Get Rid of Drool Marks

Does your slobber a great deal? On the off chance that so you’ve most likely got a group of slobber denotes everywhere throughout the house. You can bid a fond farewell to cleaning off those slobber checks by getting yourself some enchantment erasers.

8.Make Your Own DIY Dog Friendly Carpet Deodorizer

Do you have some dog odors you need to dispose of? On the off chance that you don’t have any exceptional items available don’t stress – you can make your very own basic canine cordial floor covering deodorizer with things you have around the house.S

9.Prevent Dog Hair From Clogging the Drain With a Baby Wipe

When you wash your dog does their hair end up stopping up your drain? Utilize an infant wipe to help prevent the dog hair from stopping up it.

10.Make Your Own Pet Bed Out of a Sweatshirt

Need to give your canine a decent comfortable spot to rest without purchasing a puppy bed from the store? Make them this too cool puppy bed out of a sweatshirt and pad.

11.Purchase a Kiddie Pool For Your to Keep Your Dog Busy

Does your puppy appreciate the water? Keep your pooch cool in the late spring by utilizing a plastic kiddie pool out in the yard. They’re reasonable, as well. I got our own for around 6 bucks at my nearby Meijer.

Purchase a Kiddie Pool For Your to Keep Your Dog Busy

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1. Brain Training For Dogs Review: Is it worth buying it? |Latest Review 2019

Brain Training For Dogs Review: Is it worth buying it? |Latest Review 2019

I really deeply love pets (especially dogs). I love when they show (hand/arm movements)/actions of Love towards you when they come and Jump on you after we return back to our House from Work or Trip.

Everyone loves these acts of love.. right? 

Dogs are the most famous kind of pets that humans like to keep and adopt and do you know why?

That’s Because They are Super Smart and 

Understand Human Feelings 

The Best. 

They come to know that their Master is in trouble or whether or not he is in good mood right now. And they’re 100% loyal, too.

All this aside, dogs also have some problems..

..They can be behavioral or related to food , sleep , body or anything else.

No dog is perfect and every dog has any problem in any field or anything he or she is struggling with .

Most of the Time its their Owner that struggles the Most. 

So, in this article, I will write a described/explained and Latest Review of Brain Training For Dogs…

…and i will share my story that can make your life simpler and I hope you can learn from it!

This story will shock you and you will learn a lot from It.

Who am I?

Hi, My name is Katherine Williams and I Work for an IT Company in Texas. I have Two Dogs named Max and Heidi. I am Obsessed with Dogs, to be Honest. I am Married and Have a Baby Boy as well. I usually Tell People that I Have Three Kids 😛 ( Haha).

I Just Love Dogs and Playing With Them. I also Love Talking to and Meeting New Dogs and Their Owners. It is Kinda Difficult to Manage Both Work and Home ( Kids , Max , Heidi, and my Hubby ) but I have Learned to do it With Experience.

The one in Left is Heidi and Right one is Max. He seems Shy though ( Kidding) .

CLICK ME (FULL ACCESS TO THE PRODUCT)

So Heidi has Caused Problems for me and I and my Husband had to struggle due to her. She is Hyperactive. Many Dogs are Hyperactive and sometimes they really piss their owners.

She Always Wanted My or Ricky’s ( My Husband) Attention. She can win an Oscar when it Comes to Seeking your Attention. She used to Bark Continuously, Not only on People but also when at Home ( Not Always).

Whenever I used to take her for a Walk, She used to get Hyperactive and Start Barking on People for No Reason. Apart from This, Heidi used to Bite us when we used to Play with her. At First, I Thought that she did it Mistakenly or Unintentionally, but with Time I Felt that she was Doing it Deliberately.

We were Pissed off as My Hands had got Teeth Marks on it and Doctor Prescribed me a Cream that was Quite Expensive. I used to give her other soft Toys to Chew as well but it didn’t work.

I was Struggling to Control my Heidi but I Loved her. Slowly I was Getting Pissed due to her Barking and Aggressive Behaviour as well. I remember the Night when Ricky Invited her Office Friend and their Family for Dinner and Heidi got so Much Aggressive on them and especially their Little Children that she scared me as well.

Thank God she didn’t Bite them that Night. Ricky and I got very Embarrassed and Apologised for Heidi’s Behaviour as well.

After that Day, i Made a List of Behavioral and other Problems that Heidi had and i came up with the Following:-

  • Aggressive Behavior Towards Strangers and People ( Often Not Strangers to Me, They were an acquaintance )
  • Barking on People or Sometimes for No reason even in Relaxed Environment at Home.
  • Demanding Attention all the Time (It’s not possible for me as I have other things to do as well)
  • Looking at Me all the Time to Seek Attention
  • Running around the house here and There for no Reason ( Hyper-activeness)
  • Biting while Playing

We Researched on the Internet and Found that if We Don’t Pay Attention to her or have an Eye Contact with her, she would stop Seeking Attention. We Tried but it didn’t work out. For the Biting Problem, we used some chew toys and soft toys but it was temporary as well.

I also Read on the Internet that For Aggressiveness and Hyper-activeness i had to Train Her. Really?? 

At First, I Thought Training her would be a Hard Task and it may cost me Thousands of Dollars as well. Also , I didn’t had any Time to Train her in My Daily Routine.

What to Do?? I was Really Confused and Wanted an Escape Plan. Biting Problem is still only upto me but aggressive behavior was too Serious to Ignore ( Especially after that Dinner Incident ) .

How Did I Find Adrienne Farricelli’s Brain Training for Dogs?

So I was just Searching and Researching a lot on Dogs Forums and Internet and Social Media Websites Day in and Day out. I Swear i didn’t research so much about pregnancy or anything else in my life as I did for Heidi’s Problems.

I Had to Train my Dog and I had To Learn it. So after Researching and Reading Hundreds of Pages on Internet, I came to Know About  Adrienne Farricelli’s Brain Training for Dogs.

I Learnt that Adrienne Farricelli is a Professional Dog Owner and She has Trained Thousands of Dogs in her 10 Year Old Career and she has Developed this Training Course to Help Dog Owners Overcome the Behavioral and Other Problems that they face from their Dog.

I had to Give it a Try as it was Cheap and Regarding The Reviews that i had read about this Course From The Dog Forums and Social Media Websites. Just Look at Adrienne Farricelli Training a Dog Below :

What is “Brain Training For Dogs” Training?

The Most Important Thing about Brain Training 4 Dogs and the thing that I Liked the Most is that it is a Force Free Training. You don’t need to force your Dog in any way or hurt him in any way. Just as the Name Suggests ” Brain Training”.

Before Buying this Course I used to feel that Dogs must be Trained by Showing Dominance or some kind where they are forced to do something in order to avoid any certain Punishment. That’s why I didn’t wanted to Train my Dog, Lol Foolish Me.

Due To Force Free Training and Positive reinforcement, Dogs Feel Increased Thinking Capacity and Their Intelligence gets Increased as well.