3 Easy Tips On How to Train Your Dog to Stop Jumping | Brain Training Dogs

If you want to know how to teach / train your dog top stop jumping (on you or your friends… read these 3 gold and easy to follow tips on how to solve this problem.

There’s nothing harder than having welcomed guests over just to greet them with a raucous hello from your Labrador. Or worse still, imagine your exuberant retriever coming home from grocery shopping to almost be trampled on.

While in many dogs jumping is a natural behavior and in some cases may be an indication of affection, it is a behavior that should not be exhibited by a well trained dog.

How To Teach / Train Your Dog To Stop Jumping On You | Brain Training Dogs

Follow these simple guidelines to train your dog to stop jumping and turn your home into a more inviting place:

1.) Identify the reason for your dog to jump. Is it used as a form of guest aggression or a friendly greeting for members of the family? Find out where your dog-jumping behavior is at its worst and plan your workout in this situation.

2.) Turn calmly to the side and ignore the dog when you or your guest enters the house, when your dog tries to jump up as usual. This prevents the dog from gaining a firm grip and also removes the positive reinforcement that the dog receives from exhibiting this behavior (your attention and the feeling of dominance of the dog itself).

3.) Turn back to your dog and warmly praise it when your dog refrains from jumping and settles down a little..

..Reward it with a small reward for food as well..

..To stick, this scenario must be repeated several times.

Continue to praise your dog for its new behavior pattern once the behavior is extinguished and the dog no longer jumps up when you enter your home.

If you want to learn more valuable tips for dog training click here (or read my review here)

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How To Train A Dog To Stop Pulling On A Leash

Pulling on a leash can be an unwanted habit acquired by many dogs. However, often well-meaning owners encourage this particular behaviour.

Unknowingly, owners prompt this unwanted behavior by playing games such as leash war tug, or even just using a rope (a rope can resemble a puppy’s leash).

Pulling on a leash can be an unwanted habit acquired by many dogs!.

How To Train A Dog To Stop Pulling On A Leash

  • When teaching a puppy not to pull, or perhaps retraining a dog that has developed the bad habit of pulling the leash, the use of a quality harness could be a huge help. Try to train a dog to accept the dog harness the same way your dog accepts the regular dog collar clasp.
  • Try using a lure or toy to keep your dog at your side whenever you walk the dog. A properly applied dog training collar can be an effective way to train a problem dog. Make sure you choose a properly fitting training collar or choke chain.
  • You must always make sure the leash is loose while taking your dog for a walk. In case the dog begins to pull in front, the dog owner should change directions instantly so that the puppy quickly finds himself falling behind. Changing directions is important before the puppy reaches the end of its leash. Apart from the split second it takes the handler to change course, the leash should remain loose. A short tug, accompanied by a quick slackening of the lead, should be used.
  • You should never let the puppy drag you around whenever you train a puppy. It is absolutely essential to teach a dog to walk properly while they are still small enough to manage, especially when handling a massive breed of dogs. If your Great Dane of 150 pounds hasn’t learned how to walk properly while he or she is a puppy of 20 lbs, it’s probably never going to.
  • Never yank or tug the puppy’s neck when it comes to correcting it is crucial. A light, continuous pressure works much better than a hard yank. The ideal strategy is to use minimal pressure to achieve the desired result.

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How To Train A Dog To Walk On A Leash

Learning how to train a dog to walk on a leash is important because your dog must have regular exercise (and so should you) and it has been proven that dogs who are walked every day are better behaved and happier than those who are left alone in the yard or in the house. A daily walk is enjoyable and stimulating for both you and your dog.

But, nothing is more annoying than trying to walk a dog that is constantly pulling at the leash. You need to train your dog from the start that pulling is not acceptable behavior. This does require some patience and persistence but your walks will be a lot more pleasurable once your dog is trained to walk beside you properly.

How To Train A Dog To Walk On A Leash

1. Put your dog’s collar on and attach the leash. Pick up your end of the leash and encourage your dog to walk nicely at your side in a straight line. It’s a lot easier to walk briskly during this phase of training.

2. Once your dog has walked beside you without pulling, drop the leash and praise her.

3. Repeat this over and over. Try going in a circle and turning around. Be sure to make the sessions short but do them every day and, of course, give your dog tons of praise and treats when she exhibits the wanted behavior.

If Your Dog Tugs On The Leash

Learning how to train a dog to walk on a leash is easy if your dog walks nicely beside you by nature, but what if they pull every which way? Here’s what you should do if your dog is a “puller.”

1. Start walking and encourage your dog to walk with her head level to your leg, if she hangs back, slap your thigh to bring her up.

2. Be sure to give her lots of praise and encouragement and when her head is in the right position, give her a treat and some praise. It’s critical that you only reward her when her head is level with your leg (i.e. she is walking right beside you and her head is not forward of your leg, but right beside it)

3. If her attention starts to wander, regain it by calling her name or giving the “look” command (if she already knows it).

4. When she starts to pull on the leash, stop walking. When she looks at you to see why you stopped, pat your leg so that she knows to come back level to it. You might want to give a command “come” or “close” so she starts to associate a command with coming next to your leg.

5. Repeat this process every time your dog starts to pull and don’t forget to heap on the praise when she walks nicely beside you!

Walking your dog is one of the great pleasures in live so even though learning how to train a dog to walk on a leash takes time and patience; it certainly is well worth it!

If you want to learn more about how to train your dog, we have the right products for you! If you want to train your dog in few weeks (with video demonstration) click here.

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How To Train Your German Shepherd To Be Obedient

If you don’t know it yet, the ferocious-looking massive dogs you see with police officers or bomb squads makes for an excellent family pet. You might find that quite hard to believe but this large breed is strong, athletic and fiercely loyal – just the characteristics you’d want in a guard dog. Having said that, before you actually go and get your little German Shepherd puppy, here are a few basic things you need to keep in mind:

1. Do your research. German Shepherds are unlike other dog breeds. Because of their massive size and energy, they can be potentially dangerous and destructive. It pays to read up on this particular breed to get to know them before you even bring one home. Knowing what to expect and what to do in certain situations can save you from a ton or worry and money.

2. Be sure you’re ready. German Shepherds take a while to mature. Some experts would say these dogs don’t mature until about three years. Before bringing home a young pup, be very sure you are ready for the long haul. Domesticating these dogs that grow into massive, intelligent working dogs takes a lot of patience, commitment and energy.

Training a German Shepherd

Although individual dog owners may successfully train a German Shepherd, bringing your pup into a dog-training class may prove to be a great way to train your dog. Especially if you have never owned nor trained a German Shepherd before. Besides being trained by professionals, your dog learns from these classes what behavior is socially acceptable. Socialization is an important part of a German Shepherds training to curb their instinct for dominance.

If you choose to train your dog yourself, here are some helpful insights into German Shepherd training:

1. Start early. As soon as you bring home your new dog, begin training straight away, with emphasis on socialization. German Shepherd dogs easily develop aggressive tendencies toward other dogs and strangers as they begin to recognize and develop fierce loyalty and protectiveness toward their owners and their properties.

2. Exercise them well. A regular, rigorous exercise should be part of the dog’s training routine. The German Shepherd is a powerful dog bursting with energy. They need enough time for exercise and play. Otherwise, they’d get bored and restless. A bored German Shepherd can be very destructive.

3. Ensure consistency. Even before you introduce the dog to the family, make sure everyone knows and understands your ground rules for the new dog and enforces them. It will be more difficult to train the dog if anyone in the house lets them get away with misbehavior, more so as the dog grows older.

4. Establish yourself as the leader of the pack. German Shepherds are great working dogs because they respect leadership. This insight into these dogs’ mentality should be an advantage. Make this your primary goal. If you establish this master-dog authority relationship from the beginning, you’ll be in a better position to control, manage and train your dog further.

You can find out more on German Shepherd Training here

For more information on dog training and for solutions to a variety of dog problems please visit germanshepherdhandbook

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How To Stop Your Dog From Digging In The Backyard

If you want to know how to stop your dog from digging in the backyard, into the couch, in the grass (etc..) you are in the right place!

Some dogs get a heap of satisfaction and enjoyment through digging up your yard. It’s not that they intentionally want to destroy your impeccable flower bed, just that they love digging.

Some dog owners have resigned themselves to the fact that their dog will dig up their yard regardless of what they try, others decide they won’t tolerate it.

One way that you can guarantee to keep your dog from digging up your garden is to install a small electric fence at its perimeter. Electric fence’s are cheap to buy and extremely easy to set up. They don’t do any real harm to your dog either, they only give a very minor flick to encourage your pet not to enter the garden. Don’t worry if you have children as these fences can be adjusted to a very minor level that won’t hurt your child should they touch it.

You can try placing foul moth balls throughout the garden – this is a technique that is very effective but also has a downside. First, the positives: your dog will hate the smell of these and stare clear of the garden, they are also totally harmless and can be hidden out of sight. The only real downside is that you’ll need to replace these from time to time, especially it it’s been raining.

You can also try using a spray deterrent. Bitter apple spray is very effective and easy to use. You simply spray it around the garden every few days and your dog will not want to dig there. Bitter apple dog deterrent can also be used to stop your dog from chewing household furniture and opening the trash bag. Once your dog becomes accustomed to the smell, it will stay well clear off the area.

Dog’s dig because they are conditioned to do so. Its in their blood. If you work consistently to stop your dog digging using the tricks mentioned above, you should be able to almost totally eradicate the problem.

Make sure you are persistent and from when training your dog not to dig. Don’t expect results overnight and prepare yourself for the occasional digging spree. In time and with persistence your dog will learn to stop digging.

Discover more about How to Stop Dogs From Digging today. For expert advice, read this Secrets to Dog Training Review.

How To Train Your Dog To Come When Called Every Time

How To Train Your Dog To Come When Called Every Time

Training your dog to ‘come’ when you ask is not simply an issue of obedience. It can also be a matter of safety and certainly it is a big part of good manners in a variety of circumstances.

Certainly if you and your dog frequent off-leash dog parks, walk on off-leash trails or in the woods, you will want her tot come when you call either to go home or just to check that she’s okay and still within earshot.

In the chaos of saying goodbye to visitors, your dog goes through the door with them and is headed for the street. Don’t you want to feel confident that when you say, “Puppy, come”, your dog will turn away from danger?

It’s likely that not all your visitors will appreciate being jumped on when they arrive. Your ability to have your dog ‘come’ to you will mean a calmer entrance and a more pleasant greeting fro everyone.

First, though, let’s talk a little bit about how to teach your puppy NOT to come.

Scenario: Your puppy is playing with other dogs in the dog park or in a friend’s fenced yard, wherever… you call puppy to ‘come’. She comes. You snap on her leash and leave. It won’t take many repetitions of this before she no longer comes. What you have taught her is that coming to you means the end of fun. NOW, there’s problem. Your puppy no longer comes reliablywhen you call. That’s not going to work!

Training your puppy to ‘come’ when you ask is not simply an issue of obedience. It can also be a matter of safety and certainly it is a big part of good manners in a variety of circumstances.

Certainly if you and your dog frequent off-leash dog parks, walk on off-leash trails or in the woods, you will want her tot come when you call either to go home or just to check that she’s okay and still within earshot.

In the chaos of saying goodbye to visitors, your dog goes through the door with them and is headed for the street. Don’t you want to feel confident that when you say, “Puppy, come”, your dog will turn away from danger?

It’s likely that not all your visitors will appreciate being jumped on when they arrive. Your ability to have your dog ‘come’ to you will mean a calmer entrance and a more pleasant greeting fro everyone.

First, though, let’s talk a little bit about how to teach your puppy NOT to come.

Scenario: Your puppy is playing with other dogs in the dog park or in a friend’s fenced yard, wherever… you call puppy to ‘come’. She comes. You snap on her leash and leave. It won’t take many repetitions of this before she no longer comes. What you have taught her is that coming to you means the end of fun. NOW, there’s problem. Your puppy no longer comes reliablywhen you call. That’s not going to work!

If you catch this early on, it’s easy enough to fix. Really, it’s what you ought to have done in the first place.

Quite simply, when your puppy is playing with others in an off-leash area, call her to you every minute or so, grab her collar, give her a treat and say, “Go play.” Do that several times. The next time you call and she comes, grab her collar, praise her and say, “Go play.” No treat. If she shows any reluctance to come, go back to the treat for a couple more repetitions. Then just praise her when she comes and release her with the “go play”. The play becomes the reward.

Choose carefully your times to call her. If she’s completely absorbed in rough and tumble play, chances of her coming are greatly reduced. Watch the action. Wait for a moment’s pause, then call. The minute she turns towards you, begin a stream of “good dog”, “what a good dog”, ” what a clever girl”. I.e. talk her to you.

Depending on how reliably she usually comes, you may have to move a little closer the first few times. Do NOT go right to her. Wait for the pause in play. You may only be 2 feet away from her at this point.. Call her name. Pause. “Come”. When she comes, grab her collar, praise her, give her a treat and release her with “go play”.

Above all, do not stand 20 or 30 feet away calling, “Puppy, come” in an increasingly louder and more irritated tone. You do want her to come, don’t you?

Now, let’s go back to the early days of having your puppy…

You bring her home when she’s somewhere around 8 weeks of age.

First: Use her name to get her attention. Reward her when she turns towards you. Practise now using the release word you have chosen – OK, All done, Free.

I found it difficult to remember to release my dog when I trained my own puppy many years ago, so I suggest you start training yourself early and often. It’s important to let puppy know that she’s now free to resume whatever else she may have been doing.

When you say, “Puppy” and she turns toward the sound of your voice, add “come”.

It looks like this: stand very still in front of and about 1 foot away from your puppy. Say, “Puppy, come”. As she begins to move (even a tiny motion) in your direction, begin to praise her (an excited high-pitched tone works best) and take a few short rapid steps backwards, encouraging your puppy as she moves. Don’t move more than 2 feet. When she reaches you, grab her collar, give her a treat and lots of praise and release her.

When she has moved to a different location – could be a different area of the same room, a different room or even two feet away from where you just asked for a “come”, repeat. Repeat this 2 or 3 times. That’ll do for this session. You can move a little farther back if she’s coming to you willingly and quickly when you ask.

I think it’s important to simply incorporate training into daily activity. As you move around throughout the day, ask Puppy to “come”, “sit”. Then reward, praise and release her. By the end of day 1, the reward is the release and only very occasionally will there be a treat. That’s very important.

We’re talking about a very young puppy here so when I say move around, the puppy is only with you outside her confinement area when she’s empty.

When puppy is coming to you whenever you ask at a distance of, say, 4 feet, 8 times out of 10, it’s time to step it up.

Now, from a beginning distance of 2 feet, ask puppy to come and when she does, hold a treat at her nose, move it between her eyes back over her head. Her bum drops to the floor and you’ve now got a “sit”.

Do it again and as you put the treat to her nose, say, “Puppy, sit”. Treat moves back, bum goes to floor. Praise, treat and release.

Stay with your 4 foot distance for a few (3-5) repetitions as you now ask for a “come, sit’ before you reward, praise and release.

Try omitting the food reward after 3 or 4 repetitions. The sound of your happy voice and the release are the best rewards for your puppy.

Continue to give a treat from time to time for an especially quick “come’ or a speedy, straight “sit’. That’s called random reinforcement and it prevents reliance on food rewards. You don’t really want to have a pocketful of treats for the rest of your dog’s life, do you?

In a few short steps, here’s how it works:

1. Reward and praise puppy for responding to her name.

2. Reward, praise and release puppy when you ask her to “come” and she does.

3. When she “comes” reliably, add “sit” before the reward. So – “Puppy, come, Puppy, sit”. Tell her she’s a good puppy and reward her with a treat or a toy, whichever she likes best.

4. As the reliability of “Puppy, come” increases i.e. she comes 8 times out of 10 requests, increase first the distance between you and then add distractions.

Get a reliable “come” (recall) at a distance of 20 -30 feet in a safe area before asking for a “come” when your puppy is playing with a group of dogs (distraction).

As with all puppy training, once the request is taught, you must continue to ask for it frequently throughout her lifetime. Reward occasionally with a treat or a toy and always praise and release.

What a clever owner! What a good dog!

Visit: www.braintraining4dogs.com . By following her training suggestions, you’re sure to develop a great relationship with your dog!

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What Is Dog Separation Anxiety and How to Reduce It | Brain Training Dogs

This problem is seen quite often in shelter dogs. I am dealing with this issue as a dog that I just adopted from a shelter has separation anxiety. If the problem is not treated or worked on it can lead to more stressful problems. This problem is not seen in every dog.

The big question is:

“How to train my dog with separation anxiety?”

Some of the signs to look for are:

Some dogs has more extreme case of separation anxiety and be more destructive than others.

Destructive like chewing on shoes or furniture, scratching, digging or going to the bathroom on the floors.

Barking, whining, howling.

Depression, lack of appetite, trouble breathing.

Following you from room to room.

The dog starts running in circles as you are getting ready to leave.

Some dogs may attempt to escape from the house to look for you.

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For a shelter dog that has been adopted is to have patience. The dog will learn new commands better to help combat the issue if he feels that the new home is safe, secure environment. Need to bond with your dog like playing and going on walks. This will help to use up his energy and be ready to relax alone. Create a quiet safe space for the dog only. Over time your dog will learn that he will be safe in that space while you are gone.

Next is to keep departure and arrival low key. This may be hard at first. For departing try not to pay attention to the dog for 10 to 15 minutes before leaving the house. After arriving home ignore the dog for a few minutes, than acknowledge him with some calming petting or hugs.

Offer some more comforting things for the dog by leaving a piece of clothing that will have your scent on it. This will help relax and some sense of familiarity because of your scent. Also don’t forget to leave his favorite toys and treats. Buy some treat games to him busy and the brain mentally stimulating while you are gone.

You could introduce a safety cue to be used such as “that you will be right back” for every time you leave the house. Start small by using the safety cue when you are going outside with the trash. Most of the time you are only gone a few minutes. Than keep building up the time you are away.

At first practice your departure routine by gathering your things that you take every day with you and sit down. Repeat this routine till your dog show no signs of distress. This way you are establishing a routine. Most dogs love having a daily routine with it master.

Don’t be cruel to your dog by yelling or ignoring him. This may cause the problem to get worse. Try to calm him down with relaxing petting and talking softy to him in a low tone.

The best piece of advice is to be patient, consistent and persisted in the technique you are using.

Separation anxiety is not a result of lack of training or disobedience but it’s a panic response.

Fawn Redman just adopted a dog that has separation anxiety issues. This is first dog that she had owned with this issue. Started a website selling many different kinds of dog products. Browse the selection now.